jk rowling’s reasoning as to why fenrir greyback turned remus into a werewolf: remus’s father insulted him so he did it as an act of revenge

the actual reason greyback bit remus: the temptation to succumb to the fact that biting remus whose name literally means ‘werewolf’ would be the greatest feat in lycanthropic irony the world had ever seen


Click It

menagerieofchaos:

crowley-king-of-ass:

the-cones-of-dunshire:

The perspective of every girlfriend Bucky Barnes has ever had tbh

image

curlykytta us

(via literaldisneyprincess)


cvmfest:

ricotomate:

A bunch of drunk college kids play “Alice in Wonderland”

what the fuclk did i just watch

the greatest thing ever

(via forestchump)




matociquala:

Rowlf and Floyd are the only grown-up muppets, and I mean grown-up in the best possible way.

laughterkey:

buzzfeed:

queen-of-evrything:

jamieaiken919:

mister-smalls:

kingcheddarxvii:

This is the most perfect video on the whole fricked up internet and we all owe it to ourselves to watch it once a day

cutest thing to ever happen on the Muppet Show, bar none

I’m not crying you’re crying

SHUT UP

This just made my day

If Rowlf isn’t your favorite Muppet we need to talk.

baby sleep!!

(via tygermama)


last-snowfall:

merrily-rolling:

last-snowfall:

algrenion:

overlypolitebisexual:

whenever i see these post-apocalyptic films set in the USA where everyone is pretty much just killing each other with no mention of other nations i always just assume that the rest of the world is fine and has learnt how to resume life as normal

 

Legit this is part of my Hunger Games AU. Like, everyone’s not fine, but there’s a whole functioning international community and all of them are at odds about what to do about Panem. They have conferences about it, but they’re less important than the trade conferences about how to tax African wheat.

… isn’t this basically how the rest of the world is treating North Korea?

Which is more or less why I consider it a VERY PLAUSIBLE reaction to Panem.

(via zillah975)


linnealurks:

fromonesurvivortoanother:

Teaching Consent to Small Children

bebinn:

mysalivaismygifttotheworld:

afrafemme:

A friend and I were out with our kids when another family’s two-year-old came up. She began hugging my friend’s 18-month-old, following her around and smiling at her. My friend’s little girl looked like she wasn’t so sure she liked this, and at that moment the other little girl’s mom came up and got down on her little girl’s level to talk to her.

“Honey, can you listen to me for a moment? I’m glad you’ve found a new friend, but you need to make sure to look at her face to see if she likes it when you hug her. And if she doesn’t like it, you need to give her space. Okay?”

Two years old, and already her mother was teaching her about consent.

My daughter Sally likes to color on herself with markers. I tell her it’s her body, so it’s her choice. Sometimes she writes her name, sometimes she draws flowers or patterns. The other day I heard her talking to her brother, a marker in her hand.

“Bobby, do you mind if I color on your leg?”

Bobby smiled and moved himself closer to his sister. She began drawing a pattern on his leg with a marker while he watched, fascinated. Later, she began coloring on the sole of his foot. After each stoke, he pulled his foot back, laughing. I looked over to see what was causing the commotion, and Sally turned to me.

“He doesn’t mind if I do this,” she explained, “he is only moving his foot because it tickles. He thinks its funny.” And she was right. Already Bobby had extended his foot to her again, smiling as he did so.

What I find really fascinating about these two anecdotes is that they both deal with the consent of children not yet old enough to communicate verbally. In both stories, the older child must read the consent of the younger child through nonverbal cues. And even then, consent is not this ambiguous thing that is difficult to understand.

Teaching consent is ongoing, but it starts when children are very young. It involves both teaching children to pay attention to and respect others’ consent (or lack thereof) and teaching children that they should expect their own bodies and their own space to be respected—even by their parents and other relatives.

And if children of two or four can be expected to read the nonverbal cues and expressions of children not yet old enough to talk in order to assess whether there is consent, what excuse do full grown adults have?

I try to do this every day I go to nursery and gosh it makes me so happy to see it done elsewhere.

Yes, consent is nonsexual, too!

Not only that, but one of the reasons many child victims of sexual abuse don’t reach out is that they don’t have the understanding or words for what is happening to them, and why it isn’t okay. Teaching kids about consent helps them build better relationships and gives them the tools to seek help if they or a friend need our protection.

This is why it’s a problem to teach children that they must unquestioningly obey adults. And why I hate it if parents say “Let Auntie So-and-So give you a kiss” when it’s clear that the child doesn’t want to.

(via goshawke)


Into the Woods is like

valerie-an:

Act I:

Haha! Quirky fairytale mashup with some twists and turns and a happy ending!

Act II:

Just kidding have some psychological drama, adult fear, and existential uncertainty

(via heatherrtepe)